Charger Spotlight: Emily Robinson

By Julia DeRogatis

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Emily Robinson

By Julia DeRogatis | Editor

December 16, 2013

Emily Robinson creates worlds.

At age five she wrote her first picture book, in eighth grade she finished her first novel, The Dome, and published it on Amazon where is has since sold 150 copies.

Now a junior at Dos Pueblos and 17 years old, she has finished two more full-length novels: the 800 page Game Board and the 400 page Seeker Agency. Robinson is currently editing Game Board in preparation for sending it to an agency.

Robinson’s major motivation to write came in the form of a family challenge.

“My aunt actually wrote a book, and she really inspired me,” Robinson said. “When I was like ten or something I was racing her to see which one of us could get our book published first, and at that time I hadn’t even written anything but I was like ‘I’m gonna beat you!'”

Laughing, Robinson shakes her head at her childhood competitiveness. “It was friendly competition of course!”

Outside of her aunt, author Tamora Pierce, the Bourne movies, and even Twilight have inspired Robinson’s writing.

“I love Edward, he’s awesome!” Robinson said. “I’m drawn to moody darkness.”

Yet despite the draw of the dark and handsome and other such archetypes, Robinson’s characters are all varied and unique.

“My stories are very much character driven,” Robinson said. “They are all very special to me and they are all different.”

Robinson initially experimented with basing her characters off of her friends, but quickly learned the downsides of that.

“[My friends] get offended if their character does something bad [or] that they don’t like,” Robinson explained, grimacing. “If you want to write a story I would suggest not basing if off of your friends,” she paused, and then added with a grin, “or don’t tell them if you are basing it off of them.”

Creating engaging characters and realistic dialogue is essential to Robinson, yet she approaches both a little bit differently.

“I am actually not empathetic, I’m somewhat sociopathic,” Robinson said. “I’m so analytical. I know that there has to be an ‘if…then’ for everything that [my characters] do.”

Like most protagonists, Robinson has her own band of Ron’s and Hermoine’s to help her reach her goals. “I have a little group of friends that I send every chapter to over email and then they read it and give me feedback,” Robinson said. “There’s some that are my cheerleaders, they never give me a negative comment, then there’s the other people who are the devil’s advocate!”

For Robinson, writing is as much of a passion as it is a fixation. Once she starts a story, she has to finish it. “I get to a certain length through the story then I say ‘Ok, I have to finish it now! I can’t drop it now that I have gotten this far,” Robinson said.

Looking into the future, Robinson has numerous aspirations that revolve around writing. “I want to go into college writing story lines for video games because I am also an avid gamer,” said Robinson.

However Robinson’s biggest goal, outside of getting her books published through a professional company, is to see her stories on the big screen. “Basically my life-long dream right now is to have one of my novels turned into a movie,” Robinson said with an excited smile. “I don’t care if it’s a crappy movie, I just want it to be a movie!”

Robinson’s novel The Dome can be purchased on Amazon. The following is an excerpt from the book:

    “How will you be ‘in charge of me’ while I sleep?” Daija asked 
sceptically. 

    “Like Dante, I can make other dream worlds,” she said, “I’ll 
make one and link your mind to it, so that when you sleep you’ll go 
back there instead of your precious Dome. We couldn’t have you going 
back to your friends every night, now could we? No. It’s much better 
this way.” 

    “What will be in this world of yours?” she asked of the person 
who would keep her mind imprisoned. 

    “That’s for me to know and you to find out. Now, shall we?” 

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